Friday, July 24, 2015

Why did humans rise to the top?

From TED 

 Yuval Noah Harari, A lecturer in history at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in his book Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, Yuval Noah Harari  asks what made homo sapiens the most successful species on the planet. His answer: We are the only animal that can believe in things that exist purely in our imagination, such as gods, states, money, human rights, corporations and other “fictions,” and we have developed a unique ability to use these stories to unify and organize groups and ensure cooperation. In his next book, he'll explore the growth of inequality in human society. He asks, are we on the cusp of the next great divergence? 

Harari specializes in world history, medieval history and military history. His current research focuses on macro-historical questions: What is the relation between history and biology? What is the essential difference between Homo sapiens and other animals? Is there justice in history? Does history have a direction? Did people become happier as history unfolded? Harari also teaches a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) titled A Brief History of Humankind







Thursday, July 23, 2015

How One Tweet Can Ruin You Life

By Jon Ronson from TED

For the longest time Jon Ronson reveled in the fact that Twitter gave a voice to the voiceless ... the social media platform gave us all a chance to speak up and hit back at perceived injustice. But somewhere along the way, things took a turn. In this passionate, eloquent talk, Ronson explains how too often we end up behaving like a baying mob — and that it's time to rethink how we interact with others online.


Pass this on. It is very important to understand just how social media can do to your life.








Friday, July 10, 2015

A cry against child marriage

Memory Banda’s life took a divergent path from her sister’s. When her sister reached puberty, she was sent to a traditional “initiation camp” that teaches girls “how to sexually please a man.” She got pregnant there — at age 11. Banda, however, refused to go. Instead, she organized others and asked her community’s leader to issue a bylaw that no girl should be forced to marry before turning 18. She pushed on to the national level … with incredible results for girls across Malawi.